CPO Program

IBWA CERTIFIED PLANT OPERATOR (CPO) PROGRAM

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

 

A. What is an IBWA Certified Plant Operator?

A certified plant operator (CPO) is any person who qualifies to operate and maintain, by experience, education, and training, the facilities of a bottled water plant. Certification is valid for a period of three years, beginning in the calendar year of the examination date and expiring on December 31 of the third calendar year. Example: A CPO candidate who attains a passing score on the examination on May 25, 2006 will be certified until December 31, 2009. A CPO must have successfully completed and passed the IBWA Certified Plant Operator Final Examination. The exam covers Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs) and the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) system of managing food safety, including source and product sanitation, water treatment technology, product quality, and record keeping.

B. Why do I need a CPO at my plant?

A CPO ensures that a production facility is under the supervision of an individual who has demonstrated a proficiency of knowledge in the areas of GMPs and HACCP, including treatment technologies, sanitation, and regulatory issues. The certification program promotes training and education, two areas that are vital to ensuring that compliance is met in all phases of production.

C. What is the IBWA Plant Technical Reference Manual (PTRM)?

The PTRM is designed to educate your plant operators in every phase of bottled water processing, from source to finished product. To facilitate study for the CPO examination, the PTRM includes background information such as water chemistry, plant sanitation, and federal regulations. There are also study questions at the end of each Chapter.

D. How does a plant operator achieve IBWA certification?

Certification is achieved through preparing for the final examination by studying the PTRM and the IBWA Bottled Water Code of Practice. The CPO candidate then registers for the IBWA CPO Final Examination. The CPO exams are proctored by IBWA staff, IBWA authorized representatives, or "alternate proctors" (defined by the IBWA Education Committee as certified school teachers or members of the clergy). Approval of alternate proctors is obtained from IBWA technical staff. Information regarding the alternate proctor, date, time, and location of the exam is submitted to IBWA prior to the exam.

CPO candidates must register with IBWA prior to the exam. Walk-in registrations are generally not accepted at CPO exams. Exams are scored by IBWA staff. Congratulatory letters and CPO certificates and the new IBWA CPO patches are mailed to candidates who attain a passing score. New CPOs are also listed in each issue of the IBWA Bottled Water Reporter.

Candidates who do not attain a passing score are also noticed and are encouraged to register for a future exam. There is no limit to the number of times a candidate may take the exam.

E. Who is eligible to become an IBWA Certified Plant Operator?

Employees of companies who are IBWA Bottler, Candidate Bottler, Distributor, and Supplier members are eligible to become a CPO. Please click here for the Certified Plant Operator Registration Form

F. Where may a CPO candidate take the examination?

The CPO examination is offered at the IBWA Annual Convention and Trade Show, and generally at state/regional bottled water association annual meetings. Additional examinations are scheduled as requested. Examinations offered under the Alternate Proctor Program are sometimes open to all IBWA members. Contact IBWA technical staff in Alexandria for a complete list of examination dates.

G. How may a CPO maintain current certification?

CPO certification is valid for a maximum period of three years. Certification may be renewed as follows:

(1) A CPO may register for the CPO examination at any time during the third year of certification; OR
(2) A CPO may accumulate a minimum of 18 IBWA Continuing Education Units (CEUs) (1 CEU for each contact hour of training). The CEUs may be earned by

A) attending IBWA-sponsored educational sessions, such as those provided at the IBWA Annual Convention and Trade Show; or
B) educational seminars and workshops offered at the state/regional bottled water association meetings; or
C) courses or seminars offered by an accredited college or university; or
D) training programs offered by suppliers; or
E) formal, in-house training programs offered by your company.

Training should focus on water technical and regulatory topics, but do not need to be limited to bottled water.