COVID-19 Information & Resources

What is COVID-19?
COVID-19 is a disease caused by the virus 2019-nCoV, more commonly known as Novel Coronavirus. Novel Coronavirus is known as one among a large family of coronaviruses that cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), according to the World Health Organization (WHO).

COVID-19 has affected hundreds of thousands of people across the globe and has been described as a new strain of coronavirus that was discovered in 2019 and has not been previously identified in humans. Common signs of COVID-19 infection include respiratory symptoms, fever, cough, shortness of breath, and breathing difficulties. People can catch COVID-19 from others who have the virus. The disease can spread from person to person through small respiratory droplets, which are spread when a person with COVID-19 coughs or exhales. To help prevent the spread of COVID-19, WHO recommends regular hand washing; covering your mouth and nose when coughing and sneezing; not touching your eyes, nose, or mouth; thoroughly cooking meat and eggs; and avoiding close contact with anyone showing symptoms of COVID-19.

Has COVID-19 been detected in drinking water? No.
The Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Water Transmission and COVID-19 webpage addressed COVID-19 transmission through drinking water stating that “COVID-19 virus has not been detected in drinking water. Conventional water treatment methods that use filtration and disinfection, such as those in most municipal drinking water systems, should remove or inactivate the virus that causes COVID-19.”

According to Drinking Water Research Foundation (DWRF) Trustee Dr. Eugene Rice, “Bottled water produced using multiple barrier treatments—such as filtration, disinfection, and reverse osmosis—during processing should also remove or inactivate the virus that causes COVID-19.”

Can COVID-19 be transmitted via food or food packaging?
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the CDC have stated there is no evidence to suggest that the COVID-19 virus is transmitted by food or food packaging, which would include bottled water. FDA issued the following statement on February 27, 2020, concerning COVID-19 and food products: 

"We are not aware of any reports at this time of human illnesses that suggest COVID-19 can be transmitted by food or food packaging. However, it is always important to follow good hygiene practices (i.e., wash hands and surfaces often, separate raw meat from other foods, cook to the right temperature, and refrigerate foods promptly) when handling or preparing foods."

In addition, the CDC’s website has a Frequently Asked Questions webpage that includes a “How It Spreads” section with the following information on whether the COVID-19 virus can be spread through food:

"Coronaviruses are generally thought to be spread from person-to-person through respiratory droplets. Currently there is no evidence to support transmission of COVID-19 associated with food. . . In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there is likely very low risk of spread from food products or packaging that are shipped over a period of days or weeks."

Is the U.S. food supply safe?
Currently there is no evidence of food or food packaging being associated with transmission of COVID-19. Unlike foodborne gastrointestinal (GI) viruses—like norovirus and hepatitis A—that often make people ill through contaminated food, SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19, is a virus that causes respiratory illness and not gastrointestinal illness, and foodborne exposure to this virus is not known to be a route of transmission.

It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads. That’s why it’s always critical to follow the 4 key steps of food safety—clean, separate, cook, and chill. For more info, visit FDA's website.

Can I get the coronavirus from food, food packaging, or food containers and preparation area?
Currently there is no evidence of food, food containers, or food packaging being associated with transmission of COVID-19. Like other viruses, it is possible that the virus that causes COVID-19 can survive on surfaces or objects. For that reason, it is critical to follow the 4 key steps of food safety—clean, separate, cook, and chill.

If you are concerned about contamination of food or food packaging, wash your hands after handling food packaging, after removing food from the packaging, before you prepare food for eating and before you eat. Consumers can follow CDC guidelines on frequent hand washing with soap and water for at least 20 seconds; and frequent cleaning and disinfecting of surfaces.

What actions can I take to help prevent the transmission of COVID-19?
The FDA and CDC have recommended many commonsense actions by industries and the public, including:

  • Hand washing and sanitizing, and general good hygiene practices.
  • Encourage employees with symptoms of respiratory illnesses to stay at home.
  • If you do not currently have a telework policy, you may want to consider implementing one where possible at least for a period until the threat is mitigated.
  • Limit travel, especially to regions identified by CDC and the State Department as being at-risk for COVID-19 infection.
  • Review the business continuity section of your food defense plan to become familiar with possible disruptions caused by local outbreaks. If your supply chain relies on materials or products from China or other affected regions, plan for alternative sources of those materials.

Are recalls on food anticipated? No.
FDA does not anticipate that food products would need to be recalled or be withdrawn from the market because of COVID-19. FDA reaches this conclusion because “there is currently no evidence to support the transmission of COVID-19 associated with food or food packaging.”

In addition, facilities are required to control any risks that might be associated with workers who are ill regardless of the type of virus or bacteria. For example, facilities are required to maintain clean and sanitized facilities and food contact surfaces.

What steps should an employer take when an employee tests positive for COVID-19?

FDA advises that if an employee in a food processing facility tests positive for COVID-19, facilities should take the following steps to ensure the foods they produce are safe:

  • Inform fellow employees of the possible exposure to COVID-19 in the workplace, while maintaining confidentiality.
  • Instruct sick employees to follow the CDC’s “What to do if you are sick with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) guidance.”
  • Re-double cleaning and sanitation efforts to control any risks that might be associated with workers who are ill, regardless of the type of virus or bacteria.
  • Consult with the local health department for additional guidance, including whether to request other workers who may have been exposed to the worker who tested positive for COVID-19 to self-quarantine for 14 days.

The FDA guidance also addresses whether a food facility must close after an employee has tested positive for COVID-19, advising that “food facilities need to follow protocols set by local and state health departments, which may vary depending on the amount of community spread of COVID-19 in a given area.” FDA says that these decisions will be based on public health risk of person-to-person transmission—not based on food safety. FDA reaches this conclusion because “there is currently no evidence to support the transmission of COVID-19 associated with food or food packaging.”

What does the FDA recommend for service industry workers who deal with the public?
The FDA recommends the following actions for service industry workers who deal with the general public:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60 percent alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.

What can food companies do?
The affect COVID-19 is having changes daily, if not hourly. Food companies are encouraged to continue monitoring developments at that national and state levels, keeping a close eye on how restrictions and curfews could affect their operations. Anticipating that potential lockdowns or curfews could affect your ability to deliver product, companies may find it helpful to provide employees/carriers with a letter confirming that individual is traveling to or from a food facility or transporting food materials in the event he/she is questioned by local authorities. IBWA members can contact IBWA for a sample letter designed to inform the reader that the person is a Critical Infrastructure Sector worker. Note, however, such a letter does not guarantee that an individual or shipment will be permitted to proceed under any state or local restriction.

State Business Closures
In an effort to slow the spread of COVID-19, states have begun to take action in closing non-essential businesses. In accordance with federal guidelines, the manufacturing and delivery of bottled water is considered life-sustaining and essential and this exempt from closure. However, there could be other businesses that your company relies upon that might be impacted by these actions. Please refer to individual state lists for what is considered essential and non-essential. Inform any supplier you may work with to also review the list and if they determine they are being considered non-essential to contact the state for a waiver.

Here is a list of the most recent states that are imposing closure of non-essential businesses.

Arizona
Stay Home, Stay Healthy, Stay Connected
In effect: 5:00 pm, Tuesday, March 31, 2020
Governor Doug Ducey issued an executive order that requires residents to limit their time away from home and practice social distancing. The order allows for the operation of nonessential business as long as the businesses do not require in-person, on-site transactions.

California
Shelter-In-Place Executive Order
In effect: Thursday, March 19, 2020
Governor Gavin Newsom and the director of the California Department of Public Health are ordering all individuals living in the State of California to stay home or at their place of residence, except as needed to maintain continuity of operation of the federal critical infrastructure sectors, critical government services, schools, childcare, and construction, including housing construction. Essential services will remain open, such as gas stations; pharmacies; food (grocery stores, farmers markets, food banks, convenience stores, take-out and delivery restaurants); banks; and laundromats/laundry services.

Colorado
Stay-at-Home Order
In effect: 6:00 am, Thursday, March 26, 2020
Colorado residents have been encouraged to stay at home, and all critical businesses in the state are allowed to continue operation while complying with social distances requirements and implementing telework strategies. Food processing, manufacturing agents, including all foods and beverages, are exempt.

Connecticut
Stay Safe, Stay Home Executive Order
In effect: 8:00 pm, Monday, March 23, 2020
The governor issued Executive Order 7H, directing all businesses and nonprofit entities in the State of Connecticut to utilize, to the maximum extent possible, any telecommuting or work from home procedures that they can safely employ. Food manufacturing, processing, storage, and distribution facilities are exempt.

Delaware
Shelter in Place
In effect: 8:00 am, Tuesday, March 24, 2020
Governor John Carney on Sunday issued modifications to his State of Emergency declaration, ordering Delawareans to stay at home whenever possible and closing all non-essential businesses in Delaware to help fight the spread of COVID-19. The orders go into effect at 8:00 am on Tuesday, March 24, 2020. They will remain in effect until May 15 or until the public health threat is eliminated. Nearly all food and beverage manufacturing and suppliers for the industry are exempt.

Florida
Stay-at-Home Order
In effect: 12:01 am, Friday, April 3, 2020
Governor Ron DeSantis issued an executive order requiring Florida residents to stay at home and only essential business services to continuing operating. The state will follow the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s guidelines for essential businesses, and the order will extend until at least April 30, 2020.

Georgia
Shelter-in-Place Order
In effect: 6 pm, Friday, April 3, 2020
Governor Brian Kemp announced a shelter-in-place order for all 159 counties of Georgia and will close K-12 schools through the rest of the school year. The order would be in effect until April 13. The Governor's Directive begins Friday, April 3, at 6:00 pm and will remain in place until Monday, April 13, 2020. The Governor's Directive includes language to define the food and beverage industry as an essential workforce and critical infrastructure as recommended by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Agency.

Hawaii
Order to Stay at Home, Work from Home
In effect: 12:01 am, Wednesday March 25, 2020
Governor David Ige signed a proclamation ordering the entire state to stay at home and work from home starting at 12:01 am, Wednesday, March 25 through April 30. Essential workers, including food production, are exempt. The move comes after the mayors of Honolulu and Maui counties announced their own stay-at-home orders.

Idaho
Stay Home Order
In effect: 1:30 pm, Saturday, March 25, 2020
Governor Brad Little and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare issued a statewide Stay Home Order on Wednesday, March 25, for all Idahoans. The order covers the entire state and begins immediately. It will last for at least 21 days. It requires Idaho residents to stay and work from home as much as possible, while ensuring all essential services and business remain available. Idaho’s order adopts the guidance from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security on “Identification of Essential Critical Infrastructure Workers during COVID-19 Response.”

Illinois
Stay-At-Home Order
In effect: 5:00 p.m. Saturday, March 21, 2020
Governor JB Pritzker has signed a statewide stay-at-home order, aiming to keep new cases of COVID-19 from rapidly increasing and ensure the state's health care system remains fully operational to treat patients in need of urgent care. Food and beverage production is exempt.

Indiana
Directive to Hoosiers to Stay at Home
In effect: 11:59 pm, Tuesday, March 24, 2020
Governor Eric J. Holcomb issued an executive order that Hoosiers remain in their homes except when they are at work or for permitted activities, such as taking care of others, obtaining necessary supplies, and for health and safety. The order is in effect from March 25 to April 7. The order applies to all nonessential businesses but exempts food production, distribution, fulfillment centers, and storage facilities.

Kansas
Stay Home Order
In effect: 12:01 am, Thursday, March 30, 2020
By executive order from Governor Laura Kelly, residents are required to stay in their homes or residences unless preforming an essential activity. Businesses identified via the state’s Kansas Essential Function Framework (KEFF) as essential include companies that produce and provide human and animal food products and services.

Kentucky
Healthy at Home: Closing None Life-Sustaining Business
In effect: 8:00 pm, Thursday, March 26, 2020
Building upon prior executive orders, Governor Andy Beshear has required all businesses not deemed as life-sustaining to be closed. Food and beverage manufacturing, production, and processing is exempt.

Louisiana
Stay-at-Home Order
In effect: 5:00 pm, Monday, March 23, 2020
Governor John Bel Edwards issued a statewide Stay-at-Home order to further fight the spread of COVID-19 in Louisiana. The order is set to expire at the end of the night on Sunday, April 12. The governor will re-evaluate the need for the statewide Stay-at-Home order and other mitigation measures currently in place to determine if they need to be extended beyond April 12. Nonessential businesses are ordered to temporarily close must reduce operations to continue with minimum contact with members of the public and essential employees, while requiring proper social distancing, adhering to the 10-person limitation on gathering size. The state is deferring to the Essential Worker Functions under the Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) guidelines, which would exempt food and beverage production.

Maine
Closure of Nonessential Business and Operations
In effect: 12:01 am, Saturday, March 25, 2020
Governor Janet Mills extended actions to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in the state by ordering the closure of all nonessential business and operations that are public facing. The state is following federal guidelines established by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security regarding essential critical infrastructure workers and is exempting food production businesses.

Maryland
Stay-at-Home Order
In effect: 5:00 pm, Monday, March 30, 2020
Governor Larry Hogan has ordered a “stay-at-home” directive in response to the coronavirus pandemic. This includes the closing of all nonessential businesses and schools which went into effect on Monday, March 23, 2020. For business, the state will follow the federal guidelines for critical infrastructure sectors and food and beverage manufacturers will be exempt.

Massachusetts
Stay-at-Home Advisory
In effect: 12:00 pm, Tuesday, March 24, 2020
Governor Charlie Baker has announced a stay-at-home advisory until April 7: “All non-essential businesses ordered to close beginning at noon on Tuesday.” During this time grocery stores and pharmacies will remain open. All roads remain open. Grocery stores, wholesalers, and every company involved in the delivery of necessities will be allowed, including food manufacturer employees and their supplier employees.
Update: Governor Baker has extended the closure of nonessential businesses, originally set to expire on April 7, until May 4.

Michigan
Stay Home, Stay Safe Order
In effect: 12:01 am, Tuesday, March 24, 2020
Governor Whitmer has issued a Stay Home, Stay Safe Order (“Order”) for the State of Michigan to prevent the further spread of COVID-19. Executive Order 2020-21 goes into effect on March 24 at 12:01 am and stays into effect until April 13 at 11:59 pm. The Order specifies “[n]o person or entity shall operate a business or conduct operations that require workers to leave their homes or places of residence except to the extent that those workers are necessary to sustain or protect life or to conduct minimum basic operations.” Food, agriculture, water, and wastewater are deemed critical infrastructure and are exempt.

Minnesota
Directing Minnesotans to Stay Home
In effect: 12:01 am, Friday, March 27, 2020
By executive order from Governor Tim Walz, all residents are required stay at home until Friday, April 10, 2020. This will include the shutdown of all nonessential business. As used in this order, “workers” and “personnel” are broadly defined to include employees, contractors, vendors, and volunteers. As used in this executive order, “Critical Sectors” is defined to include the categories found in the CISA Guidance. This includes food and agriculture workers listed in the CISA Guidance, including agricultural equipment repair services.

Mississippi
Nonessential Business Closure
In effect: Tuesday, March 24, 2020
Governor Tate Reeves issued an executive order requiring all nonessential business to cease all but minimum operations. The order remains in effect until Friday, April 17, 2020. The state will follow the federal guidelines established by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security regarding essential critical infrastructure workers and is exempting food processing and production.

Montana
Stay-at-Home Directive
In effect: 12:01 am, Saturday, March 28, 2020
All businesses and operations in the state, except essential businesses and operations, are required to cease all activities within the state except minimum basic operations as ordered by Governor Steve Bullock. For purposes of this directive, individuals may leave their residence to provide any services or perform any work necessary to offer, provision, operate, maintain, and repair essential infrastructure, which includes food production, distribution, storage, and sale. This directive will remain in effect until Friday, April 10, 2020.

Nevada
Closing of Nonessential Businesses
In effect: 11:59 pm, Friday, March 20, 2020
Governor Steve Sisolak ordered the closing of all nonessential businesses in the state. The directive shall not be construed to hinder the ability of the industries identified in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security Cyber & Infrastructure Security Agency Essential Critical Infrastructure Workforce memorandum. The directive remains in effect until Thursday, April 16, 2020.

New Hampshire
Stay at Home Order
In effect: 11:59 pm, Friday, March 27, 2020
Governor Chris Sununu issued a Stay at Home emergency order that requires all non-essential businesses to end "in-person and public interacting operations by midnight Friday, March 27 until May 4.” The order does not apply to food manufacturer employees and their supplier employees—to include those employed in food processing facilities or beverage production facilities, including breweries, wineries, and distilleries; and the production of food packaging.

New Jersey
Stay-at-Home Order
In effect: 9:00 pm, Saturday, March 21, 2020
To mitigate the impact of COVID-19 and protect the capacity of New Jersey’s health care system for the state’s most vulnerable, Governor Phil Murphy signed Executive Order No. 107, directing all residents to stay at home until further notice. The order provides for certain exceptions, such as obtaining essential goods or services, seeking medical attention, visiting family or close friends, reporting to work, or engaging in outdoor activities. If your business is not a retail business, you may continue to operate, but you must accommodate your workforce, wherever practicable, for telework or work-from-home arrangements.

New Mexico
Public Health Order
In effect: 8:00 am, Tuesday, March 24, 2020
Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham announced additional restrictions to disrupt the spread of the COVID-19 virus in New Mexico and instructed New Mexicans to remain in their homes or places of residence except for outings absolutely necessary for health, safety, and welfare. All businesses, except those entities identified as “essential businesses,” are hereby directed to reduce the in-person workforce at each business or business location by 100 percent. Exempts manufacturing operations involved in food processing.

New York
In effect: 8:00 pm, Sunday, March 22, 2020
Listing of essential businesses 
Waiver application

North Carolina
Stay-at-Home Order
In effect: 5:00 pm, Monday, March 30, 2020
Governor Roy Copper issued an executive order requiring all residents of North Carolina to stay at home and to practice social distancing in any public situations. The order also requires the shutdown of nonessential businesses with exceptions as defined by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s critical infrastructure guidance, which includes food and beverage manufacturers. The order remains in effect for 30 days.

Ohio
Stay-at-Home Order
In effect: 11:59 pm, Monday, March 23, 2020
Governor Mike DeWine announced that Ohio will be under a Stay-at-Home order. The order will go into effect beginning Monday, March 23, 2020, at 11:59 pm and will remain in effect until 11:59 pm on April 6, 2020, unless the order is rescinded or modified. All nonessential businesses are required to cease all activities, but those businesses that are part of the Essential Worker Functions under the Cybersecurity & Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) guidelines, which would include food and beverage production, are exempt.

Oregon
Stay at Home, Save Lives Order
In effect: Immediately
On Tuesday, March 23, 2020, Governor Kate Brown today issued an executive order, directing everyone in Oregon to stay at home to the maximum extent possible and adding to the list of businesses that will be temporarily closed to stem the spread of COVID-19 in Oregon. The order is effective immediately and remains in effect until ended by the governor.

Pennsylvania
Stay-at-Home Order
In effect: 8:00 pm, Wednesday, April 1, 2020
Governor Tom Wolfe has issued a Stay-at-Home Order for the state beginning Wednesday, April 1, 2020 at 8:00 pm. All Pennsylvania schools will remain closed until further notice and non-life-sustaining business closures remain in effect.
Listing of essential and non-essential businesses
Waiver application: Email [email protected] or call 1-877-PA-HEALTH

South Carolina
Nonessential business closure
In effect: 5:00 pm, Wednesday, April 1, 2020
Governor Henry McMaster ordered all non-essential businesses to close. Non-essential businesses include close-contact service providers; recreational and athletic facilitates and activities; entertainment venues and facilities; and more.

Tennessee
Stay-at-Home Order
In effect: 11:59 pm, Tuesday, March 31, 2020
Governor Bill Lee is urging all residents to stay home and closing all nonessential businesses via executive order. Businesses or organizations that do not perform essential services shall not be open for access or use by the public or its members. All critical infrastructure remains operational, and government entities and businesses will continue providing important and essential services. This includes, but is not limited to, food production, distribution, and sale.

Texas
Statewide Continuity of Essential Services
In effect: 12:01 am, Thursday, April 2, 2020
In accordance with guidance from DSHS Commissioner Dr. Hellerstedt, and to achieve the goals established by the President to reduce the spread of COVD-19, Governor Greg Abbott has issued an executive order requiring every person in Texas to minimize social gatherings and minimize in-person contact with people who are not in the same household except where necessary to provide or obtain essential services. “Essential services” shall consist of everything listed by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security in its Guidance on the Essential Critical Infrastructure Workforce.

Vermont
Stay-at-Home Order
In effect: 5:00 pm, Wednesday, March 25, 2020
Governor Philip Scott issued an addendum to a previous executive order directing residents to stay at home or in their place of residence, leaving only for essential reasons. The order also requires all businesses and not-for-profit entities in the state shall suspend in-person business operations. Critical operations including food and animal feed manufacturing, processing, and supply are exempt.

Virginia
School and Nonessential Business Closure
In effect: 11:59 pm, Tuesday, March 24, 2020
Governor Ralph Northam issued a statewide order to protect the health and safety of Virginians and reduce the spread of the novel coronavirus, or COVID-19. Executive Order Fifty-Three orders the closure of certain non-essential businesses, bans all gatherings of more than 10 people, and closes all K-12 schools for the remainder of the academic year. Governor Northam is also urging all Virginians to avoid non-essential travel outside the home, if and when possible. The closures apply to most retail establishments but do not impact other professional and business services.
Update: March 30, 2020
By Executive Order, Governor Ralph Northam has issued a temporary stay-at-home order that will continue until June 10, 2020. This will continue to impact nonessential workers and schools, which have been closed for the year, but also requires the closure of beaches (except for exercising and fishing), campgrounds with stays of less than 14 nights, and all public and private gatherings of more than 10 individuals.

Washington
Stay Home, Stay Healthy Order
In effect: 12:00 am, Wednesday, March 25, 2020
Governor Jay Inslee signed a statewide order that requires everyone in the state to stay home. The order will last for two weeks and could be extended. This proclamation will require every Washingtonian to stay home unless they need to pursue an essential activity; ban all gatherings for social, spiritual, and recreational purposes; and close all businesses except essential businesses. The food and agriculture businesses are deemed essential via the Essential Critical Infrastructure Workers list.

West Virginia
Stay-at-Home Order
In effect: 8:00 pm , Tuesday, March 24, 2020
To further combat the spread of COVID-19 in West Virginia, Governor Jim Justice issued a Stay At Home order, directing all West Virginia residents to stay at home and limit movements outside of their homes beyond essential needs. Closes nonessential businesses and operations excluding those that are part of the Essential Critical Infrastructure Workforce as defined by the US Department of Homeland Security. This would include all food and beverage manufacturing, production and processing.

Wisconsin
Safer-at-Home Order
In effect: 8:00 am, Wednesday, March 25, 2020
All individuals present within the State of Wisconsin are ordered to stay at home or at their place of residence as required by executive order from Governor Tony Evers. All for-profit and non-profit businesses with a facility in Wisconsin, except Essential Businesses and Operations, are required to cease all activities at facilities located within Wisconsin. Essential infrastructure includes, but is not limited to, food production, distribution, fulfillment centers, and storage facilities.

Helpful Resources

IBWA Media Statement
What people need to know about bottled water during COVID-19 outbreak

CDC
Coronavirus (COVID-19)
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Frequently Asked Questions
What to do if you are sick with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
Interim Guidance for Businesses and Employers to Plan and Respond to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19): Environmental Cleaning and Disinfection Recommendations
Community Mitigation Guidelines to Prevent Pandemic Influenza – United States 2017
Coronavirus Disease 2019 Information for Travel

Congressional Action
H.R.6074, the Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act – signed into law on March 6
H.R. 6201, the Families First Coronavirus Response Act – signed in to law on March 18. IBWA Summary of Paid Sick and Family Medical Leave Provisions
The Coronavirus Relief Act (Draft Bill by Republicans in the U.S. Senate), Summary by Van Ness Feldman

EPA
Disinfectants for Use Against COVID-19 (List N: Disinfectants for Use Against SARS-CoV-2)

FDA
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Frequently Asked Questions
Food Safety and the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)
Guidance for Industry: Temporary Policy Regarding Preventive Controls and FSVP Food Supplier Verification Onsite Audit Requirements During the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA)
FMCSA Expands National Emergency Declaration for Commercial Vehicles Delivering Relief in Response to the Coronavirus Outbreak
FMCSA Waives Certain CDL Licensing Regulations in Response to COVID-19 Emergency

Johns Hopkins
Pandemic Map

National League of Cities
COVID-19: Local Action Tracker

OSHA
Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19

State Resources
Stateside Associates
Multistate Associates
The Council of State Governments
National Conference of State Legislatures

U.S. Chamber of Commerce
Global Dashboard on COVID-19 Government Policies: The dashboard—which includes direct links to evolving COVID-19 issues such as government stimulus programs, guidance on critical infrastructure and workers, export restrictions, and data protection authorities across 31 countries and counting—will be updated on a regular basis to include new geographies and fields as additional information becomes available.
U.S. Chamber of Commerce Essential Workforce Tracker

U.S. Department of Homeland Security
Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA)
Guidance on the Essential Critical Infrastructure Workforce: Ensuring Community and National Resilience in COVID-19
Note: “This list is advisory in nature. It is not, nor should it be considered, a federal directive or standard. Additionally, this advisory list is not intended to be the exclusive list of critical infrastructure sectors, workers, and functions that should continue during the COVID-19 response across all jurisdictions. Individual jurisdictions should add or subtract essential workforce categories based on their own requirements and discretion.”

U.S. Department of Labor
COVID-19 or Other Public Health Emergencies and the Fair Labor Standards Act Questions and Answers
Guidance on Paid Sick and Family Medical Leave Requirements

WHO
Situation Reports
Q&A on coronaviruses (COVID-19)